A Note About Finals

There seems to be a small amount of confusion about the final portfolio. I am confused by this confusion as the full details for the final portfolio are right here.

To restate: your final portfolio should have FIVE elements: the original drafts of your flash nonfiction piece and your hermit crab essay; the revised versions of your flash nonfiction and your hermit crab essay. Lastly: the critical essay discussing your revisions. You are not required to turn in revisions of your prose poems.

Please do review the final portfolio details on the link above and let me know if you have additional questions.

Happy Holidays!

Finals Week

We will not be meeting on Dec. 14—finals week—but your final portfolios are due by 5 p.m. Details below:

Final Portfolios:

Final portfolios are due by 5 p.m., Monday, Dec. 14. All late work will have a 10 percent deduction for each day it is late, and no final work will be accepted after Dec. 16.

Portfolio components:

• first and revised drafts of flash nonfiction pieces

• first and revised drafts of received form/hermit-crab essays

• One essay, 700 to 1,000 words, which discusses the revisions made within the context of considering the lyric essay itself, both as a mode of writing and as a literary genre. You should consider the approaches you took as a writer, the choices you made in revision, as well as the larger questions raised about the genre that were discussed in our critical readings and other readings of published lyric essays this semester. To the degree necessary, this essay should use proper MLA citation (for published essays and critical references; not for your own work).

Format: If turning in hard copy, make sure all elements of the portfolio are properly labeled. For digital copies, please email to my SFUAD email address and attach each element as a separate document with a digital title that indicates what it is. If you email your final portfolios, I will email you back with confirmation of receipt. If you don’t hear from me, I did not receive it. Please only send from your SFUAD email address. Hard copies can be left in the box at my office BEN 219.

Thank you for your hard work this semester, and have a great holiday break!

Last Class

Due: First drafts of prose poems. We will have small workshop groups on your prose poem drafts. You’ll be discussing the ways in which the pieces make use of the characteristics of prose and poetic elements, and also offering general feedback and suggestions. Be sure to bring one copy for each member of your group and one copy for Julia

We will again review the elements of the final portfolio. Review them here and let me know if you have questions.

We will finish (or start) our discussion of the video essay and look at some video essays.

Prose Poem Workshop Groups:

Group 1:

Liz, Andrew, Felicia, Kim

Group 2:

Franco, Marisa, Charli, Nic

Group 3:

Daniela, Amaya, Ana Stina, Josh

Group 4:

Melinda, Marjorie, Cris, Jen H, Victoria

Assignments for Nov. 30

For those of you keeping close tabs on the syllabus (Andrew), you will notice that we have fallen behind and, with only two classes left, must make some adjustments. If only we had more time! We don’t. So here’s the deal:

We will be condensing our work looking at the prose poem and the video essay. I had hoped we could do a video essay project, but the new Macs did not arrive on time and we ran out of time. So instead, on Nov. 30 we will discuss assigned readings on the prose poem, generate a prose poem in an in-class exercise, and view video essays and discuss them. Here are the specifics:

For Nov. 30, read:

In The Next American Essay: “Foucault and Pencil” by Lydia Davis (p. 333) and “Sleep” by Brian Lennon (p. 427). Read also: “Prose Poem Essay on the Prose Poem” by Bob Hicok; “Ticking the Box” by Arielle Greenberg; “It’s Not in Cleveland, But I’m Getting Closer” by Tung-Hui Hu (handouts). Please consider both the essays themselves and, in the case of the latter three pieces, the prose poems included as examples.

Please read “On the Form of the Video Essay,” by Marilyn Freeman (TriQuarterly)

“On the Origin of the Video Essay,” by John Bresland (Blackbird)

Our goal in looking at the prose poem and the video essay is to consider how these forms relate to the lyric essay (or don’t) and what characteristics they may share or break from (or not!).

Coming Up:

December 7 is our last class meeting. You will be bringing a first draft of a prose poem to class. Although we will not have time for a full workshop, you will be meeting in small groups to read and discuss these drafts in accordance with thinking about both the prose poem as a type of lyric writing, as well as the other forms we’ve discussed this semester. Some of you will be bringing five copies (one for each group, one for me); some of you will be bringing six copies (one for each group; one for me). The exact breakdown/groups will be announced in class Nov. 30.

Final Portfolios:

We will discuss this at greater length on Nov. 30 and Dec. 7, but your final portfolios will be due by 5 p.m., Monday, Dec. 14. All late work will have a 10 percent deduction for each day it is late, and no final work will be accepted after Dec. 16.

Portfolio components:

• first and revised drafts of flash nonfiction pieces

• first and revised drafts of received form/hermit-crab essays

• One essay, 700 to 1,000 words, which discusses the revisions made within the context of considering the lyric essay itself, both as a mode of writing and as a literary genre. You should consider the approaches you took as a writer, the choices you made in revision, as well as the larger questions raised about the genre that were discussed in our critical readings and other readings of published lyric essays this semester. To the degree necessary, this essay should use proper MLA citation (for published essays and critical references; not for your own work).

Format: If turning in hard copy, make sure all elements of the portfolio are properly labeled. For digital copies, please email to my SFUAD email address and attach each element as a separate document with a digital title that indicates what it is. If you email your final portfolios, I will email you back with confirmation of receipt. If you don’t hear from me, I did not receive it. Please only send from your SFUAD email address.

Assignments for Nov. 16

We will begin the workshop of the hermit crab/scaffolding/received forms essays. The critique sheets are here. A review of workshop protocol is here. Come prepared to use your notes to contribute to the discussion. Bring one copy of your critique sheet for each author and one for Julia. These are part of your grade. You have no other assigned reading, although the following week, we will begin reading toward our next assignment: the prose poem. Your workshop will not be rescheduled if you are absent.

November 16 Workshop Group: (actual order for workshops will be announced next week)

Josh

Victoria D

Franco R

Daniela C

Nic No Shoes

Amaya

Charli

Marjorie

Anastina

Critique Sheet List:

  1. The Scaffold: What is the “received form” of the essay and how does it inform and work with the content? This portion of the critique should, in other words, be considering structure, both in and of itself, but also as it relates to the whole and the parts.

 

  1. Association: What is this piece concerned with, and where in the text do you find these associations? In other words, what information, ideas, emotions, narratives exist?

 

  1. Lyricism: Identify elements of the lyric in the writing, but also include any observations about the language of the piece.

 

  1. Response: What other observations can you offer on this piece, either about its content, its device, its execution, its use of creative nonfiction craft elements?

 

 

 

 

November 2 Special Alert: No class today; assignments below

Hi Lyric Essayists,

I’m afraid I am too sick to come to school today. Please review the following instructions for next week, and email me if you have any questions:

• First drafts of your hermit-crab/received-forms essays are due next week IN CLASS. Bring 18 copies (one for each of your classmates; one for me). The order of workshops will be assigned next week in class.

• We will discuss the readings we would have discussed today (Boully, Monson and Alexie) next week. It is not inconceivable that an in-class critical writing assignment may occur. Prepare for all possibilities and be up to date with all readings.

If you are still looking for ideas for your appropriated forms essay, here are some of the other prospects we would have reviewed in today’s class for inspiration: false indexes, listicles, field guides and tombstones. Even if you have come up with an idea, please review these to add to your understanding of the form itself.

Thanks, and see you next week.